Artboard 1 apply Artboard 1 copy 2 Mount_Logo_Primary_RGB Mount_Logo_Primary_RGB give Artboard 1 copy 3 info link Mount_Logo_Primary_RGB Artboard 1 Artboard 2 Artboard 1 visit
Back

Seminary Course Offerings

Course Offerings

The selections below provide core and elective course descriptions.

Canon Law

CANL 601 Introduction to the Code of Canon Law (3)

An introductory presentation of the historical development of canon law, the foundations and an overview of the 1983 Code of Canon Law, with special consideration given to the pastoral, theological and legal contexts of specific canons from the seven books of the Latin Code. A brief introduction and overview will also be provided of the 1990 Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs.

CANL 702 Marriage Law and the Sanctifying Office (3)

Presentation of the canons on marriage in Book IV of the Latin Code, with particular attention devoted to their theological foundations and pastoral praxis. Introduction to tribunal practices, procedures and personnel. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs.

Church History

General Courses

CHUR 501 The First Millennium: Patrology (3)
A survey of church history from Apostolic times to the Gregorian Reform. The course focuses on the development of the institutional church, with particular emphasis on the theological, political, and pastoral controversies that occasioned growth. Accented throughout the course will be how the lives and writings of the Fathers of the Church contributed to the growth of the church. Moreover, each student will be required to read primary source materials from several key Fathers of the Church. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs, and for the Church History concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program.CHUR 502 Medieval and Renaissance Church History (3)
A survey of church history from the Gregorian Reform to the Council of Trent. The course will continue the story of church development begun in CHUR 501, again centering on theological, political, and pastoral controversies occasioning growth. Accented throughout the course will be the influence of the lives and writings of great medieval thinkers on the growth of the church. Especial attention will be given to how the tradition established by the Fathers of the Church is nurtured throughout the Middle Ages. Moreover, each student will be required to read primary source materials from several key medieval Christian authors. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs, and for the Church History concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program.CHUR 601 Modern and Contemporary Church History (3)
A survey of church history from the Council of Trent to the present day. The course concludes the sequence of church history courses, CHUR 501 and CHUR 502, tracing the development of the institutional church through its  theological, political, and pastoral controversies. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs, and for the Church History concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program.CHUR 80 History of the Church in the United States (3)
A study of selected themes, topics and persons in the development of the church in the United States from Spanish and French explorations through Americanism and Modernism. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs, and for the Church History concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program.

Elective Courses

M.A. (Theology) degree candidates concentrating in Church History, concomitant with the elective requirement, take an additional one-credit directed research course for inclusion in the Research Projects Portfolio required for the degree.CHUR 901 Topics in Church History (2)
This course concentrates on the early history of the Bible. The focus is on how the Bible was brought together, how it was studied, and how it was transmitted across the early Christian and medieval worlds. While the central concern will be the Bible itself, both as a collection of texts and as a physical artifact, we will also engage principal Christian thinkers who significantly advanced the Christian appreciation for an study of the Bible. This course can be taken for credit more than once as long as the topic studied varies. Recent topics included the history of the Bible in patristic and Medieval worlds (fall 2010)CHUR 906 The Church in the Twentieth Century (2)
A study of the church in the 20th century. Emphasis is given to the pontificates of Pius XII, John XXIII, Paul VI and John Paul II.CHUR 908 The Black Catholic Experience (2)
A seminar designed to increase the students’ awareness of the past relationship between the churches and black communities, beginning with the failed Christianization of West Africa. Black American bishops, religious orders and pioneer parishes are given particular study.CHUR 909 Medieval Hagiography (2)
An exploration of a genre of literature central to the tradition of the Church. In the early and medieval church, hagiography was crucial for transmitting doctrinal and, especially, moral information from one generation to the next. Through the course of the semester students will read and discuss crucial "bestsellers" of early church hagiography as well as popular texts in order to understand both the core content and broad range of the tradition. Particular attention will be paid to which ideas seem to endure over time and across cultures and which ideas change and develop. While Latin Christian material (in translation) will be the bulk of the reading, Jewish, Islamic, and Byzantine works will be read for enrichment and comparison.CHUR 910 Medieval Mystagogy or What Did RCIA Look Like in the Early Church?
In this course we will look at the catechetical programs of important early Christian leaders, west and east, such as St. Augustine and St. Cyril of Jerusalem. Students will read how luminaries of the early church organized their thoughts on Christianity for dissemination to the people. In addition to what was communicated, students will consider how Christian doctrine was communicated to initiates. The general purpose of the course will be to introduce students to the pastoral wisdom and activities of the Fathers of the Church. The particular purpose will be to explore how Church fathers made the mysteries of the faith both accessible and persuasive to new Christians.CHUR 911 Research Seminar: History of the Church in the USA (2)
Training in oral history skills in addition to visits to prominent sites of American ecclesiastical import.CHUR 912  History of the Church in Latin America (3)
A study of Latin American church history from colonial times to the present day. Emphasis is given to contemporary issues such as liberation theology, basic Christian communities, shortages of priests, growth of lay leadership, and the Medellín, Puebla and Santo Domingo Conferences. Cross-listed as PATH 912.CHUR 913 Hispanics and the Church in the USA (3)
A study of the importance of the Hispanic factor in the church in the United States. Emphasis is given to the richness of the Hispanic cultures, past and new movements of immigration, and the manner in which the church is attempting to meet Hispanic needs. Cross-listed as PATH 913.CHUR 914 American Catholic Culture (2)
The particular context of the Catholic Church in the United States will be studied through two modes of art and architecture, demographics, drama, ethnicity, language and idiom, literature, poetry, and popular religiosity.CHUR 917 The History of Religion in the USA (2)
In guest lectures, site visits and research reports, the history of churches in the United States will be explored. Special attention will be given to those denominations that find their origins here.CHUR 918-919 Topics in the Fathers of the Church (2)
The texts and themes of this course will vary from semester to semester. Specifics will be decided upon in consultation with the students, the church history department, and the academic dean. In each case special attention will be given to the living tradition of the Church as exemplified by the lives and writings of the Fathers and as understood through the theological thought of the Fathers. The course will be primary source driven and discussion intensive. This course can be taken for credit more than once as long as the topic studied varies. Recent offerings have included Patristic Seminar: Preaching in the Work of Augustine and Gregory the Great (fall 2011); The Four Fathers of the Latin Church: Ambrose, Jerome, Augustine, and Gregory the Great (spring 2010); and CHUR 920 Jews, Christians, & Muslims in the Middle Ages.CHUR 921 History of Heaven (2)
An examination of how Christians have understood and imagined heaven down through western history. here are three goals: first, to understand the development of Christian teaching on man's final end; second, to try to plot the range of interests in and devotions concerning heaven found in Christian tradition; third, consider how presentations of heaven, either in writing or in art, create opportunities for catechesis. The course will consist of lecture and discussion.

Homiletics

HOML 701 Models of Preaching (3)
This class will treat three major aspects of homiletics: the theology of homiletics, the movement from exegesis to the homily, and the practice of preparing and preaching homilies. The treatment of the theology of homiletics will introduce students to the theology of the word of God and of preaching, and will include consideration of the definition, purposes, and principle types of preaching and teaching. The course will also help students reflect in a general way on the culture in which preaching takes place today. Pass/Fail.HOML 702 Homiletics Practicum (3)
This course continues to develop the theory and skills introduced in HOML 701 (prerequisite) primarily through practical application. Students will prepare and deliver homilies of various genres, including Sunday, weekday, wedding, funeral and special occasion. The beginning preacher will receive constructive criticism from the instructor and fellow students to help improve both delivery and content. Pass/Fail.HOML 907 Preaching the Lenten/Easter Cycle (2)
This course examines the readings of the three-year Sunday cycle of Lent and Easter as well as the Easter Triduum. While offering exegetical insights into the readings, the course will concentrate on ways to preach the cycle of readings. Prerequisite or co-requisite: HOML 701.HOML 908 Preaching Advent, Christmastide, Holy Days and Feasts of the Lord (2)
This course examines the readings of Sundays in Advent, Christmastide, and the Holy Days and Feasts of the Lord. While offering exegetical insights into the readings the course will concentrate on ways to preach the cycle of readings. Prerequisite or co-requisite: HOML 701.HOML 910 Preaching Catholic Apologetics (2)
This course looks at the biblical foundations for important areas if Catholic Apologetics, e.g. the sacraments. While preparing apologetic responses to pertinent areas of Catholic doctrine, the course will examine how to preach apologetically on these subjects from the three year Sunday and Holy Day cycle. Prerequisite or co-requisite: HOML 701.
 

Language Electives

English as a Second Language

EASL 090 English for Theology Tutorials (1 to 3 credits per semester)
Individual or small group instruction. The content and level varies according to the individual’s needs and skill level. Topics range from pronunciation, speaking and listening comprehension to writing, vocabulary development and grammar. The focus is on instruction leading to the development of communication skills effective not only with academic audiences but also in preparation for priestly service. The tutorial is designed to improve speech clarity through the study and practice of sounds and rhythm patterns of North American English. Writing skills are developed through instruction centered on assignments from seminary classes. Grammar forms are learned both through traditional rule-based methods and in the context of writing. Vocabulary development focuses on mastery of terminology necessary for seminary studies. Repeatable, as needed.

Biblical Greek

GREK 950-960 Biblical Greek I and II (3 per semester)
An introduction to the basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary of Koine Greek with translation of passages from the New Testament. Two semesters of Biblical Greek (GREK 950-960, or the equivalent) is required for the S.T.B. degree and may fulfill the language requirement for Sacred Scripture concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program. (Offered odd academic years)

Biblical Hebrew

HEBR 950-960 Biblical Hebrew I and II (3 per semester)
An introduction to Biblical Hebrew designed to enable the student to read the Old Testament in Hebrew, building vocabulary by studying words based upon frequency of use. Basic grammar and syntax are explained. May fulfill the language requirement for Scared Scripture concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program.

Ecclesiastical Latin

LATN 950-960 Ecclesiastical Latin I and II (3 credits per semester)
An introduction to the pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar of the Latin language as it has been used in the Christian Church. A basic reading proficiency in Ecclesiastical Latin (LATN 950-960, or the equivalent) is prerequisite for admission to the S.T.B. degree program. (Offered even academic years)LATN 970-980 Liturgical Latin Refresher (1 credit/pass-fail per semester)
Readings in Ecclesiastical Latin in all genres and from all periods of the church. The course builds upon prior knowledge of the language, and assumes that students will have had two college semesters or the equivalent of classical or ecclesiastical Latin. (Offered odd academic years)

Pastoral Spanish

PATH 950-960 Beginning Pastoral Spanish I and II (3 per semester)
An intensive introduction to the Spanish language in the form most useful in Hispanic pastoral ministry in the United States or mission work in Latin America. The course will develop the seminarian's ability to speak, understand, read and write in Spanish.PATH 970-980 Intermediate Pastoral; Spanish I and II (3 per semester)
A Seminary elective taught in-house with grammar, vocabulary, and drill aimed at the ministry of the deacon and priest. Instruction level adjusted by enrollment.PATH 990 Advanced Pastoral Spanish (1 per semester)
Practice in conversation and in the composition and delivery of homilies, or other compositions related to faith or morals in Spanish, emphasizing clarity of style and pronunciation. Repeatable, as needed.
Language courses are also available in French, German, Italian, Latin, and Spanish through arrangements with the University's Department of Foreign Languages.

Liturgy

LITY 501 Introduction to the Liturgy (3)
A general study of the sacred liturgy: theology, history and the renewal accomplished by Vatican II, with a concentration on the historical development of the Eucharistic Liturgy and the Liturgy of the Hours. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs.LITY 702 Deacon Practicum (1)
A pastoral application of norms for the role of deacon at celebrations of the Eucharist, the Liturgy of the Hours, Eucharistic Exposition and Benediction, Baptism, Marriage, and Funerals, with instructions in actual celebrations, along with consideration of the structure and nature of the Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults, the Pastoral Care of the Sick, and the Book of Blessings.LITY 801 Penance Practicum (1)
A pastoral application of norms for presiding at the celebration of Penance. Pass/Fail. Taken with prerequisite: SYST 801.LITY 802 Mass Practicum (1)
A pastoral application of norms for presiding at the celebration of the Eucharist. Pass/Fail. Taken with SYST 802.

Elective Courses

LITY 908 Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite (2)
Instruction in serving and celebrating Low Mass in the Extraordinary Form, including practice celebrations. Open only to 4th year students whose bishops have either required or given permission for them to learn the celebration of the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite (1962 Missal). Prerequisite: LATN 950-960 Ecclesiastical Latin I and II, or their equivalent. Pass/Fail.

Moral Theology

MORL 501 Fundamental Moral Theology I (3)
This course treats fundamental moral theology by tracing its unfolding history from the foundations in the Word of God and the Fathers of the Church through the developments made by key contributors and movements including St. Augustine, St. Anselm, St. Thomas Aquinas, and the manualists up to the status of moral theology on the eve of the Second Vatican Council. The course has two distinguishable foci. The first is the development and emergence of key themes and authors, particularly the Synoptic Gospels, St. Augustine, the pre-scholastics and Trent. The second focus is on the particular contributions of St. Thomas Aquinas and to key elements of his moral thought in the Summa Theologiae. Study of St. Thomas will include: his conception of human fulfillment, human action, more detailed examination of his virtue-focused view of Christian morality that entails the Gifts and Fryuits of the Holy Spirit and the Beatitudes, his understanding of sin, his perspective on law and morality, and grace and morality. Required for the S.T.B., M.Div., and M.A. (theology) degree programs.MORL 502 Fundamental Moral Theology II (3)
This course builds on MORL 501 Fundamental Moral Theology I and turns to modern and contemporary Catholic Moral Theology. We will examine debates over the huamn act, fundamental option theory, teleologism and proportionalism and so called "responsible dissent." We will also briefly explore the contribution of the :"new natural law theory," the "rediscovery of Thomas and virtue ethics," and liberation theology as a moral theory. Our anchor text will be Veritatis Splendor and the Catechism of the Catholic Church. The course will conclude with a look at principles of cooperation, double effect, conscience and the formation of conscience, sin (personal and social) and questions of moral culpability. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs, and for Moral Theology concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program.MORL 602 Justice and the Social Teachings of the Church (3)
Magisterial teaching on social justice, with special attention to the central themes and principles of that doctrine, as applicable globally and to the American scene in particular, so as to enable the future priest to be an advocate for justice. The course includes the commutative justice and potential parts of justice, with attention to the just war and capital punishment teachings. Attention is also given to the use of the media, and to art and morality. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs, and for Moral Theology concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program.MORL 801 Catholic Medical and Sexual Morality (3)
This fourth year core course and S.T.B. requirement examines in detail and applies Catholic moral teaching on issues of medical and sexual morality to the concrete questions of our own day. The major documents of the Holy See will be reviewed and arguments presented to equip students to summarize, explain and defend the Church's teaching on medical ethics and on the requirements of chastity for unmarried and homosexual persons. Particular attention is paid to the norms and arguments supportive of the norms of the most recent edition of the USCCB "Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services" and the norms and arguments supportive of the norms of Catholic magisterial teaching on respect for human life and human sexuality. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs, and for Moral Theology concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program.MORL 802 Sacrament of Marriage and Pastoral Care (3)
This course provides a theology of marriage that emphasizes both its natural goodness and its sacramentality. This theology is anchored in Sacred Scripture and Tradition, and serves as the context for a treatment of conjugal morality. In the first portion of the course, students will review the historical and theological developments pertaining to the sacrament of marriage, beginning with its biblical roots. The development of the sacrament of marriage then is traced: from its patristic era, through the Council of Trent, to key magisterial documents of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Additionally, this course equips students for marriage preparation and to offer pastoral care to engaged couples, married couples and their families. Required for the S.T.B., M.Div., and M.A. (theology) degree programs.

Elective Courses

M.A. (Theology) degree candidates concentrating in Moral Theology, concomitant with the elective requirement, take an additional one-credit directed research course for inclusion in the Research Projects Portfolio required for the degree.MORL 906 Survey of U.S. Catholic Moral Theologians (2)
Review and appraisal of post-conciliar fundamental moral theologians such as Lisa Sowle Cahill, Charles Curran, Richard Gula, William E. May, Germain Grisez, Kenneth and Michael Himes, Richard A. McCormick, Jean Porter and others in light of Veritatis Splendor. Required for all M.A. (theology) concentrators in Moral Theology.MORL 907 Readings from the Summa I (3)
The course will be a reading of the 1a2ae (First Part of the Second Part) of St. Thomas Aquinas’ Summa Theologiae. It concerns the beginning of the reditus to God: man’s last end, and in detail how man is particularly endowed by nature and grace to journey to his goal. Attention is given to the structure of the human act, the passions in particular, and habits. Required for the S.T.B. degree program, and for Moral Theology concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program.MORL 908  Readings from the Summa II (3 or 2)
The course is a continuation of the Summa, 2a2ae. Though useful, MORL 907 is not a prerequisite. The course deals with the theological and infused moral virtues, with their integral, subjective and potential parts. Special charisms and the states of life are also included. Required for the S.T.B. degree program, and may fulfill an elective requirement for Moral Theology concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program.

Pastoral Field Education

PFED 001-002/003-004 Pre-theology Placement (optional/noncredit)

The pre-theology pastoral formation provides introductory supervised experiences with the hungry, the homeless, the sick and the marginalized, and other opportunities for service and evangelization. Pass/Fail.PFED 501-502 First Theology Placement: Catechetics and Teaching Ministry (1 per semester)
Supervised ministry in catechetics and teaching: Seminarians gain an awareness and working knowledge of the role of religious education in the pastoral mission of the Church, a basic competence for catechesis, and age appropriate lesson planning. [Parish religious education programs or Catholic Schools]. Required for the M.Div. degree program and expected of all S.T.B. degree candidates. Pass/Fail.PFED 601-602 Second Theology Placement: Health Care or Social Services Ministry (1 per semester)
Supervised ministry in health care or social services: Seminarians develop effective listening skills, an understanding of collaborative ministry, and the ability to extend pastoral charity to the sick, the needy, and the marginalized. [hospitals, nursing homes, hospices, immigration services, youth and young adult ministries, rehabilitation services for the homeless]. Required for the M.Div. degree program. Pass/Fail.PFED 701-702 Third Theology Placement: Evangelization Ministry (1 per semester)
Supervised ministry in evangelization or social services: Seminarians continue to develop relational skills needed to relate to people across the generations, to grow in their capacity for exercising pastoral leadership, to engage in collaborative ministry, and to acquire ecumenical sensitivity. [Parish ministry, ministry to youth and young adults, campus ministry, adult religious education, Order of Christian Initiation for Adults]. Required for the M.Div. degree program. Pass/Fail.PFED 801-802 Fourth Theology Placement: Parish Ministry (1 per semester)
Parish ministry placement: Seminarians shall have a sense of self as servant leaders in the Church. Deacons regularly preach during Sunday Masses and participate in other sacramental celebrations as directed by the pastor. Pass/Fail.PFED 900 Summer Placement (0 credit)
Seminarians assigned by their diocese to a summer placement in a local parish may register for this placement. Further information regarding the "contract" and supervisor's evaluation can be found in the Seminarian Handbook. Pass/Fail.See a list of supervised field placements.

Ordination Formation / M.Div. Courses

MDIV 500 Writing Pro-Seminar (0)
A writing pro-seminar on "Making Papers Better" is required of all first theologians. Three sessions of about 75 minutes will be scheduled near the beginning of the fall semester each year and taught by a seminary professor. The content of the sessions includes: an overview of the writing process, with particular attention to the requirements for papers written during first theology, training regarding proofreading fellow students' papers to improve coherence and clarity,a nd instruction in the Boynton Beach style sheet and Turabian style documentation.MDIV 500 Lector Workshop (0)
A public speaking workshop is required of all first theologians prior to Installation as Lectors.ORDN 501-502 First Theology Formation Seminar (1 unit each semester)
Required for First Theologians and Second Pre-Theologians the weekly seminar in the fall covers "Living Celibacy Well" and the spring covers "The Theology of the Body." Includes required formation workshops (fall and spring, 2 days, 10 hours each). Pass/Fail.ORDN 601-602 Second Theology Formation Seminar (1 unit each semester)
The weekly seminar in the fall covers "The Priest as a Public Person and Christian Gentleman" and the spring covers "Praying as a Parish Priest." Includes required formation workshops (fall and spring, 2 days, 10 hours each). Pass/Fail.ORDN 701-702 Third Theology Formation Seminar (1 unit each semester)
The year-long weekly seminars cover "The Priest as a Servant Leader in a Parish Setting: Issues in Authority and Governance." Includes required formation workshops (fall and spring, 2 days, 10 hours each). Pass/Fail.ORDN 801-802 Fourth Theology Formation Seminar (1 unit each semester)
The year-long weekly seminars cover "Transition from the Seminary to the Parish: Issues and Strategies in the First Assignment." Includes required formation workshops (fall and spring, 2 days, 10 hours each). Pass/Fail.ORDN 010 Pastoral Year Internship (12 hours equivalence each semester)
The Pastoral year is an appointment by the (Arch)Bishop. This provides the seminarian invaluable experience as well as opportunities for formation and discernment. Such seminarians may register for this full-time equivalency internship. Further information regarding the "contract" and supervisor's evaluation can be found in the Seminarian Handbook. Pass/Fail.

Pastoral Music

PAMU 001/002 Introduction to Pastoral Music I (0.5 per semester)
This course is a practicum on basic vocal production skills: posture, breath support, diction. Careful attention is given to matching pitch, singing melodies in unison and alone. Some consideration is also given to reading basic written notation. Pass/Fail.PAMU 003/004 Introduction to Pastoral Music II (0.5 per semester)
The course is a practicum that reviews basic vocal production skills. Attention is given to matching pitch, if necessary. The instruction then proceeds to singing, writing and recognizing intervals - both written and sung. Singing/chanting alone and in the class ensemble are encouraged. Pass/Fail.PAMU 501/502 Pastoral Music I (0.5 per semester)
The course is a practicum that introduces aspects of chanting both in English and Latin. Attention is also given to reading both modern and Gregorian notation. Pass/Fail.PAMU 601/602 Pastoral Music II (0.5 per semester)
The course surveys the normative documents on liturgical music and includes musical examples to illustrate the points made in the discussion of the documents. Pass/Fail.PAMU 701/702 Pastoral Music III (0.5 per semester)
The course is a practicum for learning to chant the deacon/priest chants for: the Divine Office, Benediction, Exultet, Marian antiphons, introductory and penitential rites for Mass, the concluding rite at Mass, and the General Intercessions for Good Friday. Pass/Fail.PAMU 801/802 Pastoral Music IV (0.5 per semester)
The course is a practicum for learning the deacon/priest chants of the Mass including the Eucharistic Prayers. Review sessions for the Exultet, and the Good Friday/Holy Saturday liturgies will be included. The Sequences for Easter, Pentecost, Corpus Christi, and the chant of the Gospel will be studied. Pass/Fail.

Pastoral Theology

PATH 802 Pastoral Counseling (3)
The course will establish a perspective of the priest to psychology, consider the limitations of modern psychology, and highlight the advantages of the church’s vision of reality and its benefit to mental health. We will then consider the nature of rational psychology and put it into practical aspects of pastoral counseling. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs.

Elective Courses

PATH 901-904 Topics in Pastoral Theology (2)
This course can be taken for credit more than once as long as the topic studied varies. Topics to be considered include marriage lectionary, military chaplaincy, catechetics, youth ministry, ministry to the sick dying, and bereaved, campus ministry, apologetics. These electives may be cross-listed with other departments. Recent offerings have included: Strategies in the Formation of Laity (spring 2011).PATH 905 Directed Readings in Pastoral Theology (2)
Students may propose a credit bearing project under the direction of any faculty member. Such projects may be suggested by a particular pastoral focus, the pastoral placement, a language/cultural immersion program, a particular workshop, or a formation seminar. Proposals for such a course follow the standard procedure for independent study courses. This course can be taken for credit more than once as long as the topic studied varies.PATH 906 Hispanic Ministry (3)
A study of Hispanic ministry in the United States today: various issues and perspectives, challenges, and options facing the church as Hispanic ministry continues to develop in the United States. This course is required for the Hispanic Ministry Certificate.PATH 907 Spiritual Direction (2)
PATH 910 Pastoral Theology (3)
An investigation of official church teachings regarding pastoral theology and pastoral ministry, as well as key theological texts on the pastoral activities of priests and laity. Students will also explore the biblical theology, key historical writings and the example of the saints to come to understand the normative as well as speculative Catholic pastoral theology.

The course is aimed at assisting the future priest to obtain an understanding of the purpose of spiritual direction, its structure and elements of techniques (based on the Theological and Moral virtues) for use in his future parish ministry. Enrollment usually limited to fourth theologians. Cross-listed as SPIR 907.

The course is aimed at assisting the future priest to obtain an understanding of the purpose of spiritual direction, its structure and elements of techniques (based on the Theological and Moral virtues) for use in his future parish ministry. Enrollment usually limited to fourth theologians. Cross-listed as SPIR 907.PATH 911 Military Chaplaincy (2)
An exploration of the Roman Catholic military chaplaincy - from its historic roots to current day practice. Recommended for co-sponsored seminarians in all branches of military service.PATH 912 History of the Church in Latin America (3)
A study of Latin American church history from colonial times to the present day. Emphasis is given to contemporary issues such as liberation theology, basic Christian communities, shortages of priests, growth of lay leadership, and the Medellín, Puebla and Santo Domingo Conferences. May fulfill a requirement for the Hispanic Ministry Certificate. Cross-listed as CHUR 912.PATH 913 Hispanics and the Church in the USA (3)
A study of the importance of the Hispanic factor in the church in the United States. Emphasis is given to the richness of the Hispanic cultures, past and new movements of immigration, and the manner in which the church is attempting to meet Hispanic needs. May fulfill a requirement for the Hispanic Ministry Certificate. Cross-listed as CHUR 913.PATH 917 Pastoral Theology of Youth Ministry (2)
Evangelization and pastoral care of the youth and young adults requires specialized training for Parish Priests. While instincts and natural inclination to serve young people in the church and in the modern world may come naturally for some ministers, there are techniques based on sound Catholic Theology that can provide all future priest an opportunity to grow in knowledge an confidence in this much needed field of pastoral activity. Church Documents, emphasis on authentic spiritual conversion, scriptural references, as well as best pastoral practices will be offered to seminarians as a way to encourage and strengthen their resolve in serving a sector of society that seeks guidance, direction, and care from a loving shepherd.

Pre-Theology

PPHL 505/MAP 505 Natural Theology (3)
This course examines the truths about God that can be known through reason. It focuses principally on the natural theology of St. Thomas Aquinas and concludes with a discussion of contemporary approaches to natural theology.PPHL 506/MAP 506 Philosophical Anthropology (3)
This course introduces students to the philosophy of the human person, tracing the development of philosophical anthropology through the writings of major philosophers, and culminating in the personalism of Pope John Paul II.PTHL 001 Catechism of the Catholic Church I (3)
This course seeks to introduce students, who may or may not lack any developed comprehension of Catholic doctrine and tradition, to a systematic presentation of the major articles of faith, and to a detailed commentary on the history and foundations of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Parts I and II. Prerequisite for the S.T.B. program.PTHL 002 Catechism of the Catholic Church II (3)
This course treats content of the third and fourth pillars of the Catechism of the Catholic Church and gives attention to how this content may be effectively taught to youth and adults by a study and comparison of the Universal catechism and the USCCB Catechism for Adults and the YouCat edition of the Catechism. Building on a foundation of Christian faith (Pillar I) and of the sacramental system of the Church (Pillar II) we will study the moral life worthy of the dignity of a Christian called to live the Gospel of Christ in Pillar III. Concluding our course, the course continues to Pillar IV the teachings on Christian Prayer as the living out of the mystery of our faith in relationship with God. This course prepared candidates for the two day workshop on Catechetics and the yearlong pastoral field education placement in Catholic Education. S.T.B. candidates are expected to complete both the workshop and the placement as a requirement of their program.PTHL 003 Pre-theology Formation Pro-Seminar (3)
A study of the Church’s vision of priestly formation as presented in Pastores Dabo Vobis and The Program of Priestly Formation (PPF) as implemented at Mount St. Mary’s Seminary. The course will focus on the various theological and philosophical issues associated with the four major areas of priestly formation: human, spiritual, intellectual, and pastoral formation. Included as part of PTHL 003, a writing pro-seminar is required of all first year pre-theologians. Three sessions of about 50 minutes will be scheduled near the beginning of the fall semester each year and taught by a seminary professor. The content of the sessions includes: an overview of the writing process, with particular attention on the requirements for papers written during the first year of pre-theology, training regarding proofreading fellow students' papers to improve coherence and clarity, and instruction in the Boynton Beach and Turabian style sheets and MLA documentation. Pass/Fail.PTHL 004 Prayer According to the Scriptures (2)
A study of the selected prayers and instructions for prayer in both the Old and New Testaments with special attention to the Psalms and to the prayers of Jesus. Examples of the Christian use of the Bible for various forms of meditative prayer will also be studied. The course provides the opportunity to consider helping others to use the Bible for prayer.PTHL 005 Vocation, Discernment, and the Spiritual Exercises (2)
An introduction to the concepts of personal vocation, the dynamics of discernment, and key elements of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius Loyola.PTHL 006 Introduction to Vatican II Documents (2)
Overview of the historical and theological context of the Second Vatican Council; survey of its documents and their continuing implementation in the life of the Church.

Sacred Scripture

SCRP 501 Introduction to Biblical Studies: Wisdom and Psalms (3)
This course provides the student with an introduction to biblical studies. Students are introduced to principles of Catholic scriptural interpretation: inspiration and inerrancy; the formation of the canon; the relationship of the Old and New Testament, biblical typology, etc. The development of biblical manuscripts and translations is covered as is a survey of the history of biblical interpretation over the centuries is included. Students are introduced to various methods of biblical exegesis, both ancient (e.g. allegory) and modern/contemporary (e.g. form, source, redaction criticism) and informed of their strengths and limitations, as per the Church's Scripture documents. Students will apply their knowledge from the course in the writing of an exegesis paper on a biblical text; specifically, on a passage from either the Pslams or Wisdom literature. Required for the S.T.B., M.Div., and M.A. (theology) degree programs.SCRP 502 Pentateuch and the Historical Books (3)
This course provides the student with an introduction to the Pentateuch and Historical Books of the Old Testament (Gen-Deut, Joshua, Judges, I-II Sam, I-II Ki, I-II Chron, Ezra, Neh, I-II Macc). The course follows SCRP 501 in the curriculum. Students will read through each of the biblical books with emphasis upon those passages contained in the Sunday Lectionary. The theological, historical, and literary features of each book will be discussed, along with their larger contributions in the canon of Scripture. Through careful study, students will gain a clearer understanding of these biblical books in order to preach and teach them effectively. Students will apply their knowledge from the course in the writing of an exegesis paper on a discrete passage from one of these biblical books. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs and for Sacred Scripture concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program.SCRP 601 The Prophets (3)
A general introduction to the Old Testament prophets, both pre-classical and classical. After an introductory treatment of general questions concerning the nature and history of prophecy, the individual prophets are treated, as far as possible, in chronological order so that they may be seen in their historical settings. Select passages, especially those in the lectionary, will receive detailed exegesis. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs and for Sacred Scripture concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program.SCRP 602 Matthew and Mark (3)
An introduction to the Gospels of Matthew and Mark. After an initial introduction to the Synoptic Problem, issues to be examined for each book will include authorship, dating, recipients, sources, life setting, overall compositional plan, authorial purposes, the use of the OT in the NT, and theological themes and emphases. Each book will be read carefully. A number of passages will receive detailed analysis, in particular, Matthew's Passion narrative. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs.SCRP 701 Gospel of Luke and Acts of the Apostles (3)
An introduction to the Lukan double work looking at authorship, dating, sources, redaction and the theological themes and emphases of Luke. Select passages, especially those in the Lectionary, will receive detailed exegesis. Required for the S.T.B., M.Div., and M.A. (theology) degree programs.SCRP 702 Johannine Writings: Gospel, Revelation, and Letters (3)
A study of the Gospel, the Letters, and the Book of Revelation. Consideration of authorship, dating, and the situation of the Johannine community; analysis of the structure of each of the works, exegesis of selected passages, and examination of important Johannine themes. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs and for Sacred Scripture concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program.SCRP 801 The Pauline Literature and Pastoral Letters (3)
Examination of the accounts of Paul’s conversion and missionary activity in Acts and in his Letters; reading of his Letters with a view to development of Paul’s theological understanding of the mystery of Christ and its transforming effect on Christian life. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs and for Sacred Scripture concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program.

Elective Courses

M.A. (Theology) degree candidates concentrating in Sacred Scripture, concomitant with the elective requirement, take an additional one-credit directed research course for inclusion in the Research Projects Portfolio required for the degree.SCRP 914 Themes in Biblical Theology (2)
This course will afford the opportunity for students to study one specialized topic, or several interrelated topics, which are treated more generally in the core courses in Sacred Scripture (e.g., the priesthood, the apostles) in much greater depth. This course can be taken for credit more than once as long as the topic studied varies. Past offerings have included: Priesthood and Vocation in the Scriptures (spring 2013/spring 2012-online); Holy Rosary (fall 2012); Biblical Christology of Pope Benedict XVI (fall 2011); The Holy Land and the Seminarian (spring 2011); Scriptural Apologetics (spring 2010);  Jesus and the Apostles (spring 2010); and  Jesus and the Gospels in Early Christianity (fall 2009).SCRP 916- 918  Exegetical Studies of Selected Texts (2)
This course is an in-depth study of selected books of the Bible (e.g., Hebrews, Psalms) or a selected genre from the Scriptures (e.g., the Parables, Sermons on the Mount/Plain), with special emphasis on interpretation valuable for the ministry of the priest. This course can be taken for credit more than once as long as the topic studied varies. Past offerings have included: Studies in the Parables of Jesus (spring 2009); and Acts of the Apostles (spring 2009).SCRP 970 Readings in Greek: The Gospel of John (2)
This course will consist of selected readings and exegetical analysis in Greek New Testament from the Gospel of John. The course will strengthen the students’ knowledge of Greek grammar, syntax and vocabulary. The course will also enhance the students’ exegetical and interpretive skills. Cross-listed as GREK 970. Prerequisite: GREK 960 (Offered even academic years).

Spiritual Theology

SPIR 502 Christian Spirituality (3)
This course presents the primary principles and practices of wholesome and integrated spirituality, outlines the contributions of acknowledged authorities in the Christian spiritual life through the centuries, and introduces students to the fundamentals of spiritual direction. Required for the S.T.B., M.Div., and M.A. (theology) degree programs.SPIR 907 Spiritual Direction (2)
The course is aimed at assisting the future priest to obtain an understanding of the purpose of spiritual direction, its structure and elements of techniques (based upon the Theological and Moral virtues) for use in his future parish ministry. Cross-listed as PATH 907.SPIR 908 Themes in Spirituality (2)
This course can be taken for credit more than once as long as the topic studied varies. Recent offerings have included: St. Therese of Lisieux (fall 2011).
 

Systematic Theology

SYST 501 Revelation, Faith, and Theology (3)
This course in fundamental theology, which doubles as an introduction to systematic theology, begins with a first look at the relations that obtain among Revelation, faith, and theology. It then examines in greater detail these themes in the opposite order. First, the nature, content, methods,and history of Catholic theology as a particularly intellectual response to faith is presented. Second, faith itself is examined as the primary human response to God's personal revelation as it is present in the individual and within the Church. Finally, the sources, interpretation, transmission, and development of Revelation are elucidated. For this reason, the course, after a brief introduction, treats in turn the theology of theology, the theology of faith, and the theology of Revelation. In this way all of the classical themes of fundamental theology are addressed: Scripture and Tradition, canonicity and inspiration, creed and dogma, and Church and Magisterium. Required for the S.T.B., M.Div., and M.A. (theology) degree programs.SYST 502 Theology of the Tri-personal God (3)
This course familiarizes students with magisterial teaching about the Holy Trinity, and the historical doctrinal errors this teaching seeks to correct. Using texts from Joseph Ratzinger (as was at publication of course materials), St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, and Bl. John Henry Newman the course will explore various Scriptural and theological explanations of the Church's doctrine on the Trinity. Next, this course examines speculations in Trinitarian theology from Karl Rahne, Hans Urs von Balthasar, and other contemporary trends in light of previous course material. Finally, we will briefly survey some catechetical tools and methods for teaching the doctrine of the Trinity. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs.SYST 604 Sacraments: Baptism and Confirmation (3)
A study of the nature of sacramentality, and of the sacraments in general, and their relationship to Christ and the church. Baptism and Confirmation as initiation into the church: their biblical sources, historical and liturgical development, and contemporary questions, including catechetical considerations. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs, and for the Systematic Theology concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program.SYST 605 Grace I: Protology and Anthropology (3)
This course, which may also be entitles the Theology of Creation and the Human Person, employs historical, textual, and above all systematic approaches to investigate the overarching mysteries of creation and the human person as well as the ancillary teachings these mysteries imply: creation from God, the created order, providence, the human person as image of God, the sexual distinction, the original state, the relation of nature to grace, the Fall and its consequences, evil and sin, and the natural desire for God. St. Thomas Aquinas (whose presentations of these issues are available for embracing later insights of Catholic tradition, human reason, and personal experience) serves as master guide for organizing the various dimensions of these mysteries into a coherent whole. Required for the S.T.B., M.Div. and M.A. (theology) degree programs.SYST 606 Grace II: Grace and the Theological Virtues (3)
This course studies the mystery of grace and its God-directed expressions in the graced human responses of faith, hope, and love. Both method and content, always rooted in Scripture, follow the teachings of St. Thomas Aquinas which, coordinated with earlier and later insights of the Catholic tradition and human reason, serve to organize the various mysteries of grace into a coherent whole. Certain preliminary issues introduce the mystery of grace, which is addressed in questions concerning the Old and New Laws, necessity, nature, kinds, causes and effects of grace, the new life of grace offered by Jesus Christ, the relation of uncreated to created grace, the relation of grace to the sacraments, and the divine indwelling. St. Thomas' teachings are also consulted for an in-depth study of the three theological virtues as the supernatural habits that enable one to live the graced life. The divine indwelling, the infused moral virtues, ad the Gifts of the Holy Spirit are briefly introduced in this context. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs.SYST 704 Holy Orders (3)
An historical and systematic study of Orders: the Scripture texts, patristic sources and later development of dogma. Development and theology of the three degrees of the sacrament of Orders, and emphasis on the ordained’s configuration to Christ, the Head and Shepherd of the church, in his triple office of priest, teacher and pastor. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs.SYST 705 Christology and Soteriology (3)
The central mystery of the Christian faith is Christ: who he is and what he has done for us. The first aspect of the mystery is studied in Christology in the proper sense; the second aspect is studied in the part of Christology called Soteriology or Theology of Redemption. A systematic approach to Christology guides this course's review of key historical moments in the Church's theological elucidation of the mystery of Christ and his salvific work. After the nature and method of the discipline is introduced, classical Christology is examined from the perspectives of a Catholic reading of Sacred Scripture, its development in the controversies, councils, and Fathers of the early Church, and St. Thomas Aquinas's synthesis in the Summa Theologiae's first tract on Christ. The problems that arose in the modern period are then identified ad critically addressed, and a brief look at contemporary approaches to Christology is undertaken. Christology proper concludes with a synthesis that attempts to offer the best Catholic thinking in terms of method and content with an eye toward outlining an adequate Christology for the future. Soteriology begins with introductory lectures that situate the discipline and provide a general overview of the questions to be addressed. Its career is photographed at key historical moments: emergence from the pages of Sacred Scripture, major developments in the Patristic period, the sharpened articulations of the medieval period, particularly those for St. Anselm and St. Thomas Aquinas. and the Reformation teachings. Finally, contemporary developments and questions are approached through the teachings of John Paul II. The course concludes by attempting an adequate Soteriology that does justice to redemption as ontology, liberation, reconciliation, satisfaction, and redemptive love. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs, and for Systematic Theology concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program.SYST 707 Ecclesiology I (3)
This course will analyze the origin, nature, and mission of the mystery of the Church. There is a particular focus on the preparation for the church in the Old Testament and on the establishment of the Church by Christ and the holy Spirit. The course examines the essence and structure of the Church as the sacrament of salvation and the eschatological goal of the Church - union with the Trinity. In general, the course highlights the ecclesiological teaching of Vatican Council II and its subsequent development in Magisterial teaching. There will be a special emphasis on the marks of the Church of Christ: Unity, Apostolicity, Catholicity, and Holiness. The Universal Call to Holiness will be presented as the blueprint for Christian living in each of the Christian states of life. Finally, with Lumen Gentium VIII as guide, the Church's Marian doctrine and spirituality will be presented in a Christological and Ecclesiotypical format. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs, and for Systematic Theology concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program.SYST 801 Sacraments of Healing: Penance and Anointing(2)
An historical and theological study of the development of the sacraments of Anointing of the Sick and Penance. A thorough look at the rites for the celebration of these two sacraments and pastoral practicum sessions. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs. Ordination candidates also take ORDN 802 The Good Confessor (a penance practicum/0 credit).SYST 802 Holy Eucharist (2)
An historical and systematic study of the Eucharist: the Scripture texts, patristic sources, theological development and contemporary conciliar and papal teaching, as well as a presentation of the appropriate Canons on the Eucharist from the Code of Canon Law. Emphasis on the Eucharist under four aspects: memorial sacrifice, sacramental presence, sign of unity, and eschatological banquet. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs. Ordination candidates also take LITY 802 Mass Practicum/1 credit.SYST 803 Ecclesiology II (3)
The first portion of this class offers a theological and pastoral course on the foundation, principles, goals and practice of ecumenism and missionary activity in the church today. The course studies the major magisterial documents related to ecumenism and missiology, the major inter-religious dialogues, ecumenical dialogues, the various forms of ecumenical cooperation, and missionary work. The second portion of the course will consider the immediate and final eschatology, death, judgment, purgatory, heaven and hell in the context of their ecclesiological dimensions. Required for the S.T.B. and M.Div. degree programs.

Elective Courses

M.A. (Theology) degree candidates concentrating in Systematic Theology, concomitant with the elective requirement, take an additional one-credit directed research course for inclusion in the Research Projects Portfolio required for the degree.SYST 906 Themes in Systematic Theology (2)
This course will afford the opportunity for concentrators in Systematic Theology to study one specialized topic, or several interrelated topics, which are treated more generally in one of the core courses of Systematic Theology (Trinity, Christology, Ecclesiology, Grace, Creation and Man, Sacraments) in much greater depth, using primary resources (the writings of great theologians past and present). This course can be taken for credit more than once as long as the topic studied varies. Recent offerings have included: Evangelization and Conversion (spring 2011); Gifts and Charisms of the Holy Spirit (fall 2012/fall 2010); and St. John of the Cross and the Eucharist (spring 2012).SYST 907 Readings in Soteriology (2)
A study of Patristic texts and Medieval and Modern theologies of redemption, of the various ways in which the Fathers, Doctors, and other great theologians have understood the redemptive significance of the Mission of Jesus Christ and the salvific power of His life, death, resurrection, and exaltation; in short, of what it means when the Church confesses Jesus Christ to be the Savior of the World.SYST 911 Mariology: Selected Questions (2)
This course provides a historical survey of modern Marian theology, examining 20th century development of Catholic theology of Mary in light of the Second Vatican Council. Contemporary systematic developments will be presented in an integrated fashion, with focus on Mary in her relation to, and her role in, the mystery of Christ and the church. This course can be taken for credit more than once as long as the topic studied varies. Required for the S.T.B. program. Recent offerings have included: Mariology (fall 2011); Mariology in the Writings of the Fathers of the Church (fall 2009); and Mary in the History of Salvation (fall 2007).SYST 916  Great Theologians (2)
An in-depth study of the thought of a single great theologian or a theological theme as it is developed in a series of theologians over time, including such figures as St. Augustine, St. Anselm, Newman, DeLubac, Congar, Rahner and von Balthasar. This course can be taken for credit more than once as long as the topic studied varies. Recent offerings have included: The Theology of Joseph Ratzinger/Pope Benedict XVI (spring 2013); Hans Urs von Balthazar; and The Theology of Ratzinger and von Balthazar (fall 2009).SYST 917 Introduction to Patristics (2)
This course provides an introduction to the theological thought of the Fathers of the church, the historical context of their teaching, and the contribution of their teaching as privileged witnessed to the handing on of God’s revelation through Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition.SYST 920 Thomistic Seminar (3)
An in-depth study of the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas, including such topics as "The Nature of Theology," "Questions of Trinitarian Theology," etc. Prerequisite: basic Latin. Required for the S.T.B. degree program, and along with the concomitant research project may fulfill an elective requirement for Systematic Theology concentrators in the M.A. (theology) degree program. Recent topics have included: Knowing and Loving (spring 2013); and The Nature of Theology (spring 2012).